Archive for January, 2012

2012 Presidential Primary Each-vs-Other Candidate Picker

January 15, 2012

There are currently four (4) GOP Presidential Primary candidates.  To pick one out of four is not always an easy chore, especially when you have to rely on news media sound bites, the internet, political attack ads, and candidate stump speeches  for information.  Instead of trying to simply pick one out of six, another method is to compare each candidate vs. every other candidate.  Above is a 2012 Presidential Primary Each-vs-Other Candidate Picker.  It is similar to the mileage grid on a road map.

To use the 2012 Presidential Primary Each-vs-Other Candidate Picker, simply start with Candidate #1 on the left side and compare him to each of the other candidates listed in the column headings on the top of the form.  Go over, and then down from each name.  In the empty space where each pairing intersects, write in the number of the candidate you prefer.   Then, compare Candidate #2, and proceed down the list.

For example, when comparing Texans #4-Ron Paul  vs. #5-Rick Perry, write in the number “4” if you prefer Ron Paul or “5” if you prefer Rick Perry in the space where the two names intersect.

Click on the link below to view a completed example where a family or group might use this type of tool to vote on a flavor of ice cream (fiscal priorities.)

https://paycheckeconomics.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/what-is-your-fiscal-priority-taxes-government-services-job-creation-or-business-growth/

I included Democratic Presidential candidate Barack Obama in this exercise.  If your opinion is that a GOP candidate cannot beat Barack Obama in the 2012 General Election, you can save time and scratch that GOP candidate off your list.

After you have completed all the pairings, add up the numbers of times you selected each candidate.  Write the total count for each  candidate under the column entitled “NUMBER OF VOTES.”   Then, under the column entitled “NUMBER OF VOTES,” write in the ranking of each candidate.  The one with the highest number of votes gets the #1 ranking.

Having completed this exercise, you will hopefully have a better sense of who you will vote for on Primary Election Day, or at least thin out your list.